Whitehall and the Jews, 1933-1948: British Immigration Policy, Jewish Refugees and the Holocaust

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Cambridge University Press, Feb 27, 2003 - History - 332 pages
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Whitehall and the Jews is the most comprehensive study to date of the British response to the plight of European Jewry under Nazism. It contains the definitive account of immigration controls on the admission of refugee Jews, and reveals the doubts and dissent that lay behind British policy. British self-interest consistently limited humanitarian aid to Jews. Refuge was severely restricted during the Holocaust, and little attempt made to save lives, although individual intervention did prompt some admissions on a purely humanitarian basis. After the war, the British government delayed announcing whether refugees would obtain permanent residence, reflecting the government’s aim of avoiding long-term responsibility for large numbers of homeless Jews. The balance of state self-interest against humanitarian concern in refugee policy is an abiding theme of Whitehall and the Jews, one of the most important contributions to the understanding of the Holocaust and Britain yet published.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Immigration control law and administration
16
Control without visas the first five years of refugee immigration 19331938
25
New restrictions after the Anschluss March to October 1938
58
From Kristallnacht to the outbreak of war November 1938 to September 1939
97
Refugees from Czechoslovakia
142
Wartime policy 19391942
169
The response to the Holocaust
191
Postwar decisions
252
Conclusion
272
Biographical notes
285
Home secretaries and Home Office permanent under secretaries 19061950
295
Selected bibliography
296
Index
304
Copyright

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